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Getting Books to Readers in the New World of the Corona Virus.

26th Mar, 2020
Books

The corona virus presents many challenges, but the creative world is working to find different ways to connect with their audiences. Here are just a few from the book world:

The National Literacy Trust has asked children’s authors and illustrators to contact them if they have any content they’d like to share during this period – livestreams, storytelling, online drawing sessions – where they will be looking to link through on their website for parents and families, which covers all ages from birth through to 12.

Until 30th September 2020, Hachette Children’s Group are granting Permissions for authors, illustrators, teachers, librarians and booksellers to provide free-of-charge Online Story-Time and Classroom Read-Aloud Videos and Live Events In order to encourage reading and classroom read-aloud experiences to support schools, bookshops and public libraries forced to close by the COVID-19 situation. Anyone interested in applying should write to HCG.editorial@hachettechildrens.co.uk

In Ireland, book advocate and author Sarah Webb is providing Creative Bursts online workshops for the Bright Sparks initiative from the Museum of Literature Ireland

Best-selling romantic novelist Veronica Henry has been giving away and posting her books to people in isolation

HarperCollins have launched #HarperFictionFriday which will be a weekly Twitter book club, where they give away a certain number of copies of a frontlist title via NetGalley and then invite the author to host a Q & A the following Friday lunchtime, once people have had the chance to read the book. They then announce the new book at 4pm that day.

In terms of bookselling, things may be slower but retailers are responding to the changing environment. Waterstones are taking orders and sending out deliveries. Many independent shops are still running delivery only options via the internet or phone: more information on the Bookseller website, the Hive website and in these pieces from the Standard and the Guardian.